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Traditional Arts & Folklife Listing

Craft Traditions

Art Andersonart anderson
Traditional Wooden Collectibles

Art’s interest in woodworking began in his teens and he has spent many years perfecting his skills. More that twenty years ago began combining his imagination and expertise to make traditional wooden toys and circus wagons. His pieces are whimsical, and ingenious and often feature moving parts. In creating designs for his traditional wooden toys, Art often envisions a Victorian father making Christmas presents for his children, and tries to imbue his designs with that sensitivity. His love for the patina and charm of antique toys led him to formulate an aged finish for his work. Art has demonstrated at the Smithsonian folklife Festival in Washington, DC, numerous fairs, festivals and schools in New England, and has shown his work at the Sharon Arts Center in New Hampshire, the Chaffee Arts Center in Rutland, Vermont, and the Kalamazoo Center for the Arts in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands on workshops at community locations such as libraries, schools, historical societies, fairs, and festival for groups of all ages. Art welcomes visitors to his workshop in Marlow and maintains a small retail shop connected to the work space. You can visit by chance or appointment.
Fees: Negotiable.

124 Washington Pond Rd
Marlow, NH 03456-6224
603/446-3623
art.anderson12@gmail.com
www.artandersonfolkart.com

Lucian Averylucian avery
Blacksmith

Lucian Avery has been practicing the trade of a blacksmith, shaping hot iron for over 20 years. He owns a forge in Hardwick, Vermont where he teaches classes and demonstrates to groups. Lucian has learned a lot of skills from his own dedication to the craft but has also pieced together instruction from workshops with master artists across the country, books, and more intensive workshops. He was originally captivated with the goal of producing his own garden tools and has harnessed the ideals of excellence in craftsmanship, patience, and not giving up from his father, also a craftsman. Today he focuses on early American hardware and functional pieces.
Lucian has demonstrated at the Old Stone House Museum, School of Museum of Fine Art, Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, as well as many living history museums.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable.

736 Mackville Rd
Hardwick, VT 05843
802/472-3899
lucian@lucianaveryblacksmith.com
www.lucianaveryblacksmith.com

Pam Bartlettpam bartlett
New England Hooked Rugs

Pam Bartlett first began rug hooking in 1982 with noted instructor Hallie Hall of Contoocook, NH. Pam enjoys sharing her love of rug hooking and its history with people of all ages. She feels it is important to preserve the traditional arts, crafts, and skills that served the needs and provided comfort in every day life to previous generations. Pam is a certified rug hooking teacher with the Pearl K. McGown Rug Hooking Guild and has completed the teacher training program with the Rug Hooking Guild of Nova Scotia. She is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and has taught her craft at schools and workshops in the U.S. and Canada. She has been awarded two Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grants from the New Hampshire State Council on Arts to teach aspiring apprentices. She also teaches at her home studio in Loudon, N.H.

Pam’s work has been exhibited at venues in New Hampshire including Gallery 205, the Franklin Pierce Law School, both in Concord and at the American Independence Museum in Exeter. She has also exhibited her hooked rugs at the Shelburne Museum’s Green Mt. Rug Hooking Guild Annual Exhibit in Vermont and the American Folk Art Museum in New York City. Her hooked piece “Clew Bay, County Claire, Ireland” was a finalist at the Carnegie Center for Art and History’s annual exhibit in New Albany, Indiana. Pam has demonstrated at several museums in New Hampshire including Canterbury Shaker Village and Strawbery Banke Museum.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands on workshops at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable.

153 Mudgett Hill Rd
Loudon, NH 03307
603/783-9848
redhorserugs@comcast.net

Allan Batchelderallan batchelder
Dulcimer Making

Allan Batchelder builds dulcimers, a unique stringed instrument enjoyed for its beauty and delicate sound. The word dulcimer is Graeco-Roman and means "sweet song.” The dulcimer is a very ancient instrument and related to the harp and the modern day piano. It can be played as a solo instrument or in ensemble with other instruments. There are many variations of the dulcimer played around the world. Allan makes two types that are part of the American tradition. The trapezoid-shaped hammered dulcimer was brought to Colonial America from Europe. It has courses of strings running horizontally and is played with delicate felt-covered hammers. The hourglass-shaped Appalachian dulcimer evolved in the mountains of the southern United States. It has fewer strings and is typically strummed. Allan began playing and building dulcimers in the late 1970s. He uses mostly locally obtained woods and hand wood-working techniques. His demonstrations include an emphasis on the importance of hand-made craft in modern times.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and performances at fairs and festivals, museums, and other community locations such as libraries and historical societies. Interested in demonstrating primarily to families and adult audiences.
Fees: $150 to $200 per day plus expenses (supplies and mileage).

PO Box 138
Stratham, NH 03885
603/502-0566
dulcimerab@yahoo.com

Galen Bealegalen beale
Shaker Poplarware

Galen was taught the "fancy craft" of Shaker poplarware by Eldress Bertha Lindsay and Eldress Gertrude Sule, while she was working at Canterbury Shaker Village as an herbalist and craft coordinator. Along with Roger and Marjorie Gibbs, Galen worked to master the craft. Together they formed "Beale & Gibbs" around 1986. Galen has been demonstrating and producing poplarware containers for museums and collectors ever since. She has lectured on poplarware and taught classes at many of the Shaker villages and has spoken for Elderhostel groups, Shaker Seminar groups, and Shaker Studies’ courses. She co-authored the Berkshire House publication "Shaker Baskets and Poplarware".

Preferred activities and age groups: Presentations at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums. Interested in offering educational demonstrations for all ages and hands-on workshops for adults.
Fees: Negotiable.

34 Oxbow Pond Road
Canterbury, NH 03224
603/783-4515
riverland2@aol.com

Barbara Beelerbarbara beeler
Shaker Oval Boxes

Barbara Beeler makes bentwood boxes in the tradition of the Shakers. Shakers were well known for the quality of their oval-shaped bent wood boxes, which feature overlapping joinery fastened with copper tacks. Barbara is a New Hampshire native and learned to make Shaker boxes from Steve Allman, the former box maker for Canterbury Shaker Village. She works as an interpreter for Canterbury Shaker Village and is the lead box maker there. She has demonstrated this tradition at a variety of locations including the Wadsworth Athenaeum in Hartford, CT and the Parish Museum in Southampton, NY. Barbara represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at the expanded restaging Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton, N.H. Barbara also creates traditional Shaker-style full length cloaks in wool with sizes ranging from those for dolls, children, and adults.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at schools, fairs, festivals, museums and other community locations. Hands-on workshops with sixth grade students through adults, including the elderly.
Fees: $125 to $200 per day. A separate materials fee may be added to workshops, depending upon what type of bentwood boxes are to be created.

Swallow Tail Designs
PO Box 739
Contoocook, NH 03229-0739
603/731-5216
bbeeler255@comcast.net

Andre Belangerandre belanger
Traditional Sign Carving, Painting & Sculpture

Andre Belanger is a versatile artist with expertise in a variety of mediums. Working out of his workshop, Studio Works, located in Berlin, N.H. he makes one-of-a-kind custom signs in the tradition of early American sign makers for businesses, museums, private homes, and other needs. Andre uses traditional wood working techniques and hand tools. His signs can be left unpainted to showcase the beauty of the wood or painted with enduring colors for outdoor display. Andre is also contemporary landscape painter and sculptor. His artistic skills have brought him recognition and prestigious commissions in New Hampshire and beyond. In 2000, he demonstrated sign carving as part of the New Hampshire program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and demonstrated again at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton, N.H. He has been commissioned to create artwork for the State Arts Council’s Percent for Art program and created the Community Spirit Award for the 2005 Governor’s Arts Award. In 2006, Andre was commissioned by the Old Man of the Mountain Legacy Fund to design and fabricate the New Hampshire Profile Award, an award created to honor groups and individuals that embody the strength and character of the state symbol. Most recently, Andre designed the State of New Hampshire Medal of Honor that will be awarded posthumously to New Hampshire veterans lost in the line of duty. Andre also teaches drawing, painting and sculpture to students of various ages and abilities, including both gifted students and the developmentally disabled. He has given workshops at his studio and at various schools and institutions in multiple disciplines ranging from basic design to mural painting.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands on workshops at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages. Available for single day presentations, multiple day commitments, and long term residencies.
Fees: Negotiable.

StudioWorks
276 Pleasant St
Berlin, NH 03570
603/752-2787
andrestudioworks@yahoo.com

Rhonda Besawrhonda besaw
Traditional and Contemporary Wabanaki Beadwork

Rhonda Besaw is an internationally known beadworker of Abenaki descent. The Abenaki are a northeastern Algonkian people and one of the 5 members of the Wabanaki confederacy (comprised of the Mi’kmaq, Maliseet, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy and the Abenaki). Abenaki territory ranges from southern Quebec, NH, VT and northern MA. Rhonda’s ancestors are from southern Quebec, northern NH and all along the Connecticut River Valley in both NH and VT.

Beadwork has long been an expression of cultural identity. Rhonda is one of a relatively tiny number of beadworkers continuing to work in the traditional style of her people. Rhonda began doing beadwork in 1996, originally taught by a Mi’kmaq woman. Rhonda specializes in traditional regalia, beaded jewelry, beaded purses and beaded portraits. Her work has appeared at numerous museums, galleries and in private collections. Rhonda is a juried member for the League of NH Craftsmen, a member of the Arts Alliance of Northern NH and is the first Native American artist from NH to receive a grant from the New England Foundation for the Arts- Native Arts program. Rhonda’s work has been featured in the Bead Society of Great Britain magazine, NHToDo magazine and Indian Country Today magazine, among others. Rhonda has given beadwork classes at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, NH and has given beadwork demonstrations at the MKIM and the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, ME.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations in a variety of community and informal settings; beadwork classes for adults. Interested in presenting to high school students and adults.
Fees: $150 to $300 for a demonstration, depending upon the length of the event and travel distance.

262 Lancaster Rd
Whitefield, NH 03598
603/837-3381
besanigw@aol.com
www.rhondabesaw.com

Scott Bironscott biron
Fly Tying

Scott Biron cut his teeth learning to tie flies and fly fish back in the1960s in the North County of New Hampshire. He has fished many of the streams north of Route 26 in NH and his favorite the Androscoggin River. Scott is an active fly tying instructor for NH Fish & Game and is popular tying and instructing in national and regional shows. He was awarded a 2017 NH Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grant and studied under Peggy Brenner, where they worked on Traditional New England Streamer patterns and progressed to Classic Salmon Flies. Since then he has become a Master Artist in the Traditional Arts Program. Scott has a strong interest in historical NH fly tyers and their lost patterns and has published, researched, instructed as well as demonstrated many of these lost NH fly patterns. He enjoys instructing individuals of all ages in the art of fly tying and is known for including the history of these tyers and their flies in his instruction. Scott is considered an expert on large group instruction and offers dozens of classes year round. Each year he is an volunteer instructor at NH Fish & Game's Camp Barry's Fish Camp where he instructs over 50 campers in fly tying and fly fishing. Scott is a member of the Catskill Fly Tyers Guild and author for the NH Wildlife Journal with an article on Caddis Flies.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for all ages.
Fees: Fee negotiable depending on length of demonstration, size of workshop, and miles traveled.

63 Pierce Rd
Bradford, NH 03221
774/571-7439
nhflytyer@icloud.com
www.nhflytyer.com

Bob Boynton, Jr.bob boynton
Ox Yokes & New England Square Dance Calling

Bob Boynton has been making oxen yokes and bows since 1980. He started by making a yoke for his own team of oxen and with his Yankee ingenuity went on to make equipment for others who needed it. Bob has demonstrated ox yoke making at Muster Field Farm Days in North Sutton, New Hampshire for 23 years. He represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in Hopkinton in 2000. An active community member, he built a delivery wagon for the Goffstown Historical Society and worked on the Dunbarton Hearse Restoration Committee. Bob is also a square dance caller. He began calling dances in 1983 and has taught square dancing to 4-H clubs and at camp grounds throughout New Hampshire. He specializes in a style of calling known as “Singing Squares.” His dances also include waltzes, fox trots and polkas. He is the regular caller for a small group of dedicated dancers who meet in Contoocook, NH.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at schools, festivals, and community events for all age groups. Square dance calling for community gatherings and private functions for all ages. Can teach to square dance in one evening!
Fees: Ox yoke demonstrations – negotiable. Square dancing - minimum of $175 for caller and 3 musicians, more depending upon distance and length of event.

220 Mansion Rd
Dunbarton, NH 03046
603/774-4412
boyntonyokesnbows@gsinet.net
www.boyntonsyokesnbows.com

Margaret Brennerpeggy brenner
Fly Tying

Peggy has been tying flies for over 20 years with a specialty in flies that fish well in New England, parts of the West, and the Florida Keys. She started with the basics, progressed to Classic Maine Streamers and now Classic Salmon flies. She has studied with fly tyers nationally including a Traditional Arts Apprenticeship with Larry Antonuk. Since then she has gone on to become a Master Artist in the Traditional Arts Program taking on her own apprentice while continuing to demonstrate and teach workshops nationally. She ties for a small group of customers, as well as giving instruction with a focus on ladies and children’s classes, presentations, and demonstrations.
Peggy was a featured fly tyer at the American Museum of Fly Fishing, as part of the 2013 exhibit, “A Graceful Rise” featuring women of the past, present, and future influential to the world of fly fishing. She has been a national leader in encouraging more women to be a part of the sport of fishing and craft of fly tying. Peggy is current President of the International Women’s Fly Fishing, and a board member of the IFFF Fly Tying group, and Past President and Advisor of United Fly Tyers, the oldest tying club in the country.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for all ages.
Fees: Fee negotiable depending on length of demonstration, size of workshop, and miles traveled.

266 North River Rd
Milford, NH 03055
603/320-3056
peggyb@pbandj.us
http://pbandj.us/sixsisters/flybox/

Jeanne Brinkjeanne brink
Western Abenaki Ash Splint & Sweetgrass Baskets

Jeanne Brink is a traditional Abenaki basket-maker, specializing in ash splint and sweetgrass fancy baskets. Her grandmother, great aunt and grandmother were all basket makers and Jeanne apprentices with Abenaki basket maker Sophie Nolette, from Odanak, in Ontario. Jeanne has served as a Native American consultant to schools and organizations for over twenty years. She has a Masters of Arts degree in Native American studies and is co-author of a Western Abenaki language guide. She has co-produced of two Abenaki exhibits, and is coordinator of a traditional Western Abenaki dance group. Jeanne offers programs on Western Abenaki history, culture, language, dance, games, and family stories. She discusses the importance in Abenaki society of elders and children, the environment, and the continuance of lifeways and traditions. Programs are tailored to the requesting organization and may be supplemented by displays of Abenaki basketry and material culture and demonstrations of dances, games, and basket-making. Jeanne cultivates in her audiences an appreciation of the long history and culture of the Abenaki people and what they are trying to accomplish today.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and lectures at schools, libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable.

130 Tremont St
Barre, VT 05641
802/479-0594
azoniz@aol.com
www.avc.org

Omar Clairmontomar clairmont
Traditional Furniture: Tables & Windsor Chairs

Omar Clairmont is a fine furniture maker and carpenter. He specializes in traditional Windsor style chairs made from woods native to New Hampshire. Clairmont’s father was a self-employed sawmill owner. His inspiration to make furniture came from seeing the way a pile of lumber delivered at a local chair shop was transformed into fine furniture. Clairmont is a member of the New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association, the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers, and a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsman. Clairmont has demonstrated Windsor chair making at a variety of community events including Canterbury Shaker Village and the New Hampshire Preservation Alliance’s Old House & Barn Expo. Clairmont represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at the expanded recreation of that program at the Celebrate New Hampshire Festival in Hopkinton in 2000.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums.
Fees: Negotiable.

PO Box 194
Gilmanton, NH 03237
603/267-6685

David Courtdavid court
New England Blacksmithing

David Court began working as a blacksmith in 1971. A long family connection to New England and an intense interest in early American iron work provided him with ample examples of fine workmanship. The direct approach to the design and execution of antique iron appealed to him from the beginning. The mystery and magic of producing fine works with hammer, tongs, and open fire captivates him to this day. Over time his style of blacksmithing has broadened to incorporate a wide range of work but the austere qualities of early American iron still form the basics of his style. Court specializes in traditional joinery and especially forge welding. Court is a member and past officer with the New Hampshire League of Craftsmen, Artist Blacksmiths of North America (ABANA), The New England Blacksmiths and the American Crafts Council (ACC).

Preferred activities and age groups: Hands-on workshops, demonstrations and lectures at a variety of community settings primarily in the Merrimack Valley and at David's shop in Northfield. Commissions and private lessons available upon request. Interested in working with ages 12 and up.
Fees: Demonstrations & workshops: $400.00/day + Travel & Meals. Speaking engagements are negotiable.

291 Bay Hill Rd
Northfield, NH 03276
603/286-3097
dacourtblacksmith@gmail.com

Hildy Danforthhildy danforth
Hand Spinning

Hildy Danforth has been raising sheep and hand spinning for over 25 years, and has been knitting for even longer. She is accomplished in traditional knitting patterns and had developed some of her own. She produces a variety of yarn and garments for herself and for others. Hildy enjoys sharing the traditions of textile manufacture with new and experienced spinners, school children, and adults. The role of textiles in developing society is one she loves to share. She is particularly interested in sharing the history and traditions of fiber processing both in pre-history and in colonial New England.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops featuring hand spinning with spindles and spinning wheels using natural fibers at schools, libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums in the White Mountain region and The Great North Woods. Interested in working with Kindergarten through 4th grade and adults.
Fees: Negotiable.

725 North Rd
Shelburne, NH 03581
603/466-2621
randhdanforth@gmail.com

Fred Dolanfred dolan
Wildfowl Carving

Fred Dolan is a nationally recognized wood carver, specializing in waterfowl and song birds. Dolan has been carving for over twenty-five years and has been honored for his fine craftsmanship at numerous exhibits and gatherings of wildfowl carvers. He incorporates his extensive knowledge of wildlife conservation into his workshops and lectures. Dolan is a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen and his carvings are in many private collections. He has received several Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grants to teach apprentices. Dolan has demonstrated decoy carving at numerous festivals including the Lowell Folk Festival in Massachusetts and the Northwest Folklife Festival in Seattle, Washington. He represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in Hopkinton in 2000. He was awarded a New Hampshire State Council on the Arts Governors’ Arts Award in Folk Heritage in 2017.

Preferred activities and age groups: Lecture and slide presentations on the history of New England decoys and their makers. Hands-on workshops with adults.
Fees: Negotiable.

161 Barn Door Gap Rd
Strafford, NH 03884
603/269-5221
wildfowl@tds.net
www.freddolandecoys.com

Deborah Dostiedeborah dostie
Native American Bead Work

Deborah Bazin Dostie is a New Hampshire native of Native American descent who works in the Navajo tradition of beadwork. She first learned bead working from her Grandmother who taught her many Navajo traditions. The tradition of beading has stuck with Debbie, and it is where she says her hands and heart have found their home. Debbie is a juried member of the National Indian Arts and Crafts Association, and currently teaches and demonstrates at the Mt Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, NH.
“In all of the Native American languages, there isn’t a definitive word for ‘art.’ Creating beauty is a natural rhythm of life, and my medium is beads. Inspired by Creation, Nature and all of my Relations, with beads, I honor the beauty that surrounds me. Beading is a spiritual process, each bead coming from my heart and speaking to my soul.” –Deborah Bazin Dostie

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations, Hands-on workshops at schools, community locations such as libraries, historic societies, etc., fairs and festivals, museum settings
Fees: $150/day, presentation

120 Merrimack St
Bristol, NH 03222
603/481-0656
navajobeader@metrocast.net
www.silverwolfcreations.net

Dan Dustindan dustin
Hand Hewing & Traditional Wooden Spoons

Dan Dustin has been making spoons in New Hampshire for over 35 years. He comes from a long line of men who split wood when they needed axe handles, sleigh runners, or shingles. His wooden spoons come out of this tradition. Dustin’s spoons are worked green and split with the grain. This makes them strong, flexible, beautiful, and useful. Dan is also active as an instructor. He teaches Hand Spoon Making at the Kimball-Jenkins Art School. He frequently lectures and gives hands-on workshops to groups of all ages.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations, hands-on workshops, and lectures at schools, libraries, historic societies, museums, and lecture halls. Interested in working with groups of all ages.
Fees: Negotiable.

364 Dustin Rd
Contoocook, NH 03229
603/746-5683

Craig Evanscraig evans
Barn Frame Loom Weaving, Hand Spinning & Dyeing

Craig Evans has been weaving for over 30 years, specializing in spinning, dyeing, and traditional weaves of the late 1700s to early 1800s. He apprenticed with master weaver Norman Kennedy (2003 recipient of a National Heritage Award) from Vermont. Craig has worked as an artist in residence in Vermont schools, weaving instructor at Goddard College and given many slide lectures and hands on demonstrations in New England. Craig works in wool, cotton and flax and uses historic looms and patterns for a large bed coverings, linenwares, garments, and other textile products.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and lectures at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums. Interested making presentations to adults only.
Fees: $150 - $200 per presentation

PO Box 888
Brookfield, NH 03872-0888
603/522-5069
castor74@roadrunner.com

Marina Forbesmarina forbes
Russian Iconography, Russian Arts, Culture & Fine Crafts

Marina Forbes is a native of St. Petersburg, Russia, and an award-winning teaching artist, historian and lecturer who started painting at the age of 6 at the Hermitage Museum School of Arts and has written extensively on Russian traditional arts, history and the rich tapestry of Russian culture. She is licensed with the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg and, each year, she leads cultural tours to Russia. During her visits to Russia, she regularly updates her knowledge and artistic skills, gathering unique photos and manuscripts, participating in icon and fresco restorations in old Russian churches and monasteries, visiting craft factories, interviewing and working with master artists and scholars, and documenting traditional painting techniques (including floral and berry designs and decorative ornamentations from small villages famous for their unique craft traditions). Marina brings her extensive knowledge to her individualized icon painting classes and interactive and illustrated presentations on the Russian Icon Painting tradition.
Marina is an accomplished icon painter, working for more than 20 years with egg tempera and 23K gold leaf on gessoed wooden boards. Many of her award-winning icons are on display in churches and in private collections in Russia, Europe and the United States. Marina teaches "The Art of Icon Painting" workshops for small groups of one to four students. She also works with traditional Russian honey-based watercolors known for their brilliance of colors. Marina has a distinctive ability to generate energy and enthusiasm in the classroom or a lecture hall and to bring the spirit of traditional Russian art and folklore to life for children of all ages. She is a unique and valuable resource for any school or civic organization wishing to introduce their audience to Russian culture and arts through memorable and thought-provoking interactive presentations and hands-on workshops.

Preferred activities and age groups: Activities include hands-on workshops, demonstrations, storytelling and master classes for the whole community (adults, teens and families with children aged 6 and up) focusing on traditional Russian arts, crafts, and culture. Illustrated presentations, lectures, and storytelling are available for all age groups in age-appropriate formats. The preferred audiences for school art residencies and creative after-school programs on traditional Russian arts, crafts and culture: K-12. Special Master classes and hands-on workshops designed for teachers and art teachers are also available.
Fees: School residencies: $350 per day; hands-on workshops, lectures, and performances (1.5 to 3 hours): $200 (Note: There is an additional charge for round-trip mileage from Rochester, NH.)

16 Hillside Dr
Rochester, NH 03867
603/332-2255
marina@marinaforbes.com or marina@anylanguage.org
www.marinaforbes.com

Michael Frenchmichael french
Shaker Oval Boxes

Michael French worked as an interpreter at Canterbury Shaker Village and demonstrates Shaker boxmaking there. Shakers were well known for the quality of their oval-shaped bent wood boxes, which feature overlapping joinery fastened with copper tacks. Michael is a New Hampshire native and learned to make Shaker boxes from master box maker Barbara Beeler (also in this Listing). Michael studied Elementary Education at Plymouth State College and prior to working at Canterbury, he worked as an environmental educator at the Squam Lakes Natural Science Center. Michael has demonstrated box making throughout New England and enjoys helping people learn more about the broader tradition of bentwood boxmaking and it’s connection to Native American and Scandinavian traditions.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for schools, fairs, festivals, museums, and other community locations such as libraries, historic societies, etc. Interested in working with all age groups including the elderly.
Fees: $125 to $200 for a one day demonstration or workshop. A separate materials fee may be added to workshops, depending upon what type of bentwood boxes are to be created.

83 Main St #2
Vergennes, VT 05491
774/283-2630
michael_french@hotmail.com

Sara Glinessara glines
Traditional Dolls

Sara Boothman Glines is a traditional doll maker. Her dolls, called “SaraSally Dolls,” are based upon her family’s multi-generational history of living and working in the foothills and valley near Mount Adams, Mount Madison, and the town of Randolph in Coos County. Glines, her sister Rebecca Boothman Parker (Becky) and Sue Boothman Hawkins (1950-2004) worked together to develop two series of doll figures. One series represents family members and their stories; the other depicts favorite White Mountain activities and vocations. As much as possible, Glines uses authentic, local products for the dolls, their clothing and accessories. Each doll is a limited edition, and most are made to order or completed for display at a specific event. For her inspiration, Glines, has researched, interviewed family members, and collected historic photographs. She is active in her community demonstrating at local crafts fairs and events. She represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations in schools and hands-on workshops with children and adults focusing on creativity, problem solving, and critical thinking.
Fees: Negotiable.

172 Randolph Hill Rd
Randolph, NH 03593
603/466-5033
sarasally2@gmail.com

Sherry Gouldsherry gould
Western Abenaki Brown Ash Baskets

Sherry Gould is a New Hampshire native of Abenaki descent. Her ancestors were brown ash utilitarian basket makers, but the Abenaki community in Odanak, Quebec also developed the art of fancy basket making. Sherry studied Abenaki fancy baskets in 2004 and 2007 with master artist and Native American Historian Jeanie Brink through the State Council Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program. The Abenaki have both unique utilitarian and fancy basket styles, and Sherry has been fortunate to study with masters of both traditions. Together Sherry and her husband, William Gould, studied utilitarian Abenaki basket making in 2006 under Master artist Newt Washburn of Bethlehem, NH. Newt was a recipient of a National Heritage Award in 2005 for his craftsmanship and work in preserving the Abenaki split ash basket making techniques. Newt Washburn’s Sweetser family basket style has been prominent in Northern New England since 1850. As the master basket makers of Odanak pass on, Sherry and her husband feel very privileged to be able to make these baskets and teach other Abenaki to make them too. She demonstrates and gives workshops across the state at many cultural and historical events, and has taught two apprentices through the State Council Apprenticeship program. Sherry is the first Native American to be a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations, hands-on workshops, and lectures at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, schools, fairs and festivals, museum settings, and lecture halls; for young children with adequate adult assistance through the elderly.
Fees: $125.00 plus costs for materials for hands on projects

3210 State Rte 114
Bradford, NH 03221
603/938-2613
sherrygould@tds.net
www.westernabenakibaskets.com

Molly Grantmolly grant
Cordwainer, Shoemaker

Molly Grant began leatherworking in her early 20's, first by working on her own and then by apprenticing at the Black Swan Leather shop in Portsmouth, NH, where she learned the basic skills of traditional leatherworking. Molly first saw Cordwainer Shoes when she was ten years old at the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen's Fair, known nationally as the oldest craft fair in the nation. She became a juried member in 1989, and participated by showing her line of handbags. There, she had the opportunity to meet Paul Mathews, owner of the Cordwainer Shop. Within a few months' time Molly was traveling to craft shows nationally with Paul and learning the Cordwainer art. Molly still makes handbags, but the main business is footwear and teaching shoemaking workshops at the shop and at craft schools across the country.
Today, Molly is the owner of the Cordwainer shop where in addition to making shoes for national clients, she demonstrates and leads workshops.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for all ages.
Fees: Fee negotiable depending on length of demonstration, size of workshop, and miles traveled.

PO Box 110
Deerfield, NH 03037
603/463-7742
info@cordwainershop.com
cordwainershop.com/about.html

R.P. Halerp hale
Historical & Interdisciplinary Arts

R.P. Hale is a multigenerational and interdisciplinary artist-craftsman who has taught his skills nationwide since 1976. His expertise includes: he is a concert harpsichordist and hammer dulcimer player, harpsichord/dulcimer maker, master calligrapher and illustrator, pen-and-ink artist, nationally-known wood-engraver, Intaglio and Letterpress printer, wood carver, maker of marbleized papers and fabrics, period re-enactor, linguist, solar and archaeo-astronomer, and historian. In 1999, the Smithsonian Institute recognized R.P. as one of the top musical instrument makers in the U.S., and included his work in their exhibit devoted to these craftsmen. His concerts reflect his wide-ranging musical interests from c.750 B.C. works from China to that of Sir William Herschel of the 1790s. Born to a Sonoran Mexican family of artists and printers, his programs “La História Cultural de México,” “El Calendro Azteca,” and “Astronomy, Math. Calendars, and Histories of the Maya,” respectively feature the history of Mexico as seen through the arts and traditional lore. R.P. received a Fellowship from the State Arts Council and in 2000 was invited to present his multi-faceted traditions at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival. He performs solo and is in heavy demand by ensembles for his improvised accompaniment skills at the harpsichord and organ. R.P. teaches—and wood-carves—at St. Paul's School and is Senior Educator at the McAuliffe-Shepard Discovery Center, specializing in spectroscopy, star evolution, mathematics, physics, astronomy history and archaeoastronomy, and has built a spectroscopy/optics teaching lab there. He taught summers at the Augusta Heritage Center in Elkins WV for 33 years, in all the arts he is involved in, and is visiting faculty in art (printmaking, drawing, calligraphy) and astronomy at Davis and Elkins College.

Preferred activities and age groups: Lecture-demonstrations; workshops; master classes; residencies; living history programs and re-enactments of Leonardo DaVinci, Galileo Galilei, Sir William Herschel, and J.S. Bach; “Qui Es in Coelis: Music of Astronomy,” “History of Astronomy in Art,” “Maya and Aztec Cultures,” “Mesoamerican Art in Archaeoastronomy,” and “The Art and Science of Light and Color.” Printmaking sessions include linoleum-block, Intaglio, monoprint, wood engraving; paper-marbling, and hand-set type. Calligraphy includes Intro to Italic, Intro to 18th-Century Quill-Pen Writing, and other hands, illumination, design and applications. His programs integrate with history, sciences, mathematics, and languages.
Fees: $500-$3,200; Workshops and Master Classes: $500-$1,000; Re-enactment Presentations: $350-$1,500

59 Penacook St
Concord, NH 03301
603/225-7516
halerp@cs.com

Diane Smith Howesdiane smith howes
Barn Frame Loom Weaving, Hand Spinning & Dyeing

Diane Smith Howes has been weaving for twenty years and has been demonstrating weaving, spinning, and natural dyeing all over New England for about 15 years. She specializes in traditional hand weaving using pieces of original textile equipment and spinning flax and wool on antique wheels. In 2015, Diane completed an apprenticeship with master weaver Craig Evans to study traditional hand weaving in early New England through a Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grant from the NH State Council on the Arts. She has taken a class in traditional hand weaving from Marshfield School of Weaving in Vermont and in 2012 earned her Master’s certificate in Hand Weaving from the Hill Institute in Massachusetts.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and lectures at community locations such as libraries, historical societies, fairs, festivals, and museums. Interested in working with school aged children 6th grade through high school, college students, adults and seniors.
Fees: $200/day plus mileage

57 Pine St
Danville, NH 03819
603/382-2270
howesfarm@comcast.net

Laurel Jamiesonlaurel jamieson
Spinning, Weaving, Fiber Arts

Laurel Jamieson learned to spin fiber over 30 years ago when she took a class from Pamela Grob at The Fiber Studio in Henniker, NH. Since then she has been captivated by learning the techniques and history of many spinning techniques including drop and support spindles. Today she specializes in the process of turning a raw sheep’s fleece into a functioning textile. She is experienced in scouring, carding, combing, spinning, plying, dying, knitting, and weaving. Laurel is an avid historian who actively researches textiles from modern day through the Bronze and Iron Age.
Laurel has been a public school elementary teacher in the Manchester School District for nearly 20 years. She has integrated fiber arts into her curriculum every year, aligning the spinning and wool work with curriculum standards. She has given numerous spinning and dying demonstrations at Strawbery Banke, the Currier Museum of Art Summer Camp, the Spencer Pierce Little House, the Berwick School District, and many living history and farm museums. She has taught weaving at the NH Institute of Art in Manchester and she is currently head of a knitting club and mentoring program at Weston Elementary School comprised of 33 students and 7 mentors. Laurel spends time each summer in Scotland.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for all ages.
Fees: $150-$200/ day

332 Walnut St
Manchester, NH 03104
603/661-6997
lwjamieson@comcast.net

Garry Kalajiangarry kalajian
New England Blacksmithing

Garry Kalajian began blacksmithing full time in 1993. His work is comprised of pieces based both on historical and original designs, and is distinguished by a faithful application of traditional tools and techniques. Past commissions include door hardware, lighting fixtures, and hearth furnishings.
Mr. Kalajian has been a resident artist at Bow Middle School and Holderness School where he is now an adjunct instructor. He is the lead instructor at Sanborn Mills Farm in Loudon, N.H., an organization devoted to teaching 19th century skills. He has been awarded three Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Grants from the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts as a Master artist. He frequently demonstrates at public events including the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen’s annual fair at Mt. Sunapee State Park. He has led workshops across the US and also in Canada and Sweden.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations for all ages. If a suitable space exists, hands-on workshops for small groups of middle school age and older.
Fees: Please contact the artist.

267 Forest St
Bradford, NH 03221
603/938-2602
garry.kalajian@gmail.com
www.araratforge.com

Fred Kretchmanfred kretchman
Traditional Bamboo Fly Rods

Fred Kretchman specializes in crafting fine split bamboo fly rods. An avid fisherman himself, he got involved in making traditional bamboo rods in the early 1990s. Over the years he has mastered the nuances of making a well balanced and artistically beautiful rod suited to the particular needs of the person he is making the rod for. Kretchman also repairs, restores and appraises antique bamboo rods. He has lectured all over New England and enjoys showing others how bamboo rods are made. In 1998 Kretchman’s fly rods were featured in the Fuller Art Museum in Brockton, Massachusetts in the exhibit “Crafted for Sport.” He represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton. Kretchman has been demonstrating cane rod making at the American Museum of Fly Fishing’s ‘Festival Weekend’ held in Manchester, Vermont every May, since 1996.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations for all ages at schools, libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, museums, and other venues.
Fees: Negotiable.

48 Crockett Neck Rd
Kittery Point, ME 03905
207/439-8992
kretchmanflyrods@gmail.com
www.kretchmanflyrods.com

Dona Larsendona larsen
Norwegian Knitting & Cooking

Dona Larsen preserves her Norwegian heritage through knitting and cooking. She specializes in the making of Norwegian wool sweaters with traditional decorative patterns and embroidered borders. Her sweaters are one-of-a-kind masterpieces of skill and artistry. Dona is active in Berlin’s Norwegian community. Dona demonstrated knitting and cooking as part of the New Hampshire presentation at the 2000 Smithsonian Folklife Festival. She demonstrated again in 2000 at the expanded recreation of the Smithsonian program at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in Hopkinton, N.H. She has also worked as a “moose guide” for North Country visitors and is familiar with the folklore and habits of one of our state’s most recognizable symbols.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and workshops at community locations such as schools, libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable.

68 Marne Ave
Berlin, NH 03570
603/752-2655
donasq@aol.com

Grigory Likhtergrigory likhter
Russian Wood Chip Carving & Restoration Carpentry

Grigory is a master woodworker specializing in fine furniture, cabinetry, and traditional Russian chip carving--a style of geometric ornamentation typically done on furnishings, frames and interior elements of Russian Orthodox churches. Likhter was born in Moscow, Russia and trained as a traditional woodcarver during his teenage years. He first came to the United States at the age of 17 with his mother. He went on to graduate from the Parson’s School of Design in N.Y. and ran a successful woodworking business. He returned to Europe after the fall of the Soviet Union and ran a glass company in Finland for several years. He immigrated to the United States in 2000 and settled in Sunapee. He is active in the community and has done much of the Russian chip carving for the interior of the Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church in Claremont, N.H. Likhter’s skills now extend to historic restoration of interior wood work on early New England homes including paneling, moldings and decorative elements.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and lectures for all ages at museums and other community locations such as libraries and historical societies. Hands-on workshops for 9th grade to college aged students & adults.
Fees: $150 and up, depending upon the engagement.

59 Central St
Sunapee, NH 03782
603/763-7312
glikhter@yahoo.com
artch.gl.googlepages.com

Rodney Millerrodney miller
New England Music: Fiddler & Instrument Making

Rodney Miller is master of New England fiddling, a uniquely American blend of French Canadian and Celtic influences. He has earned a reputation as one of the country’s finest dance fiddlers. Over the past thirty years Miller has toured the United States, Canada, the British Isles, Australia and Denmark. In 1999, he also performed with guitarist and mandolin player David Surette as part of the New Hampshire presentation at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. In July of 2008, Miller performed at the 70th National Folk Festival in Butte, MT and sponsored by the State Arts Council, represented New Hampshire at the Quebec 400 festival.

Miller has recorded over ten albums. His recordings Airplang (Rounder Records) and New England Chestnuts (Vol. 1 and 2) have become classics for fiddlers worldwide, and many of his original compositions have gone on to become fiddle tune standards. Rodney’s most recent recording is Spyglass: Waltzes, which he recorded with his daughter, Elvie Miller playing piano and accordion. Rodney was prominently featured in a documentary on contra dance in New England called Together in Time.

Rodney is also a gifted instrument maker for Stamell Stringed Instruments. From his workshop in New Hampshire, Rodney crafts individually handmade violins, as well as wonderful student instruments known as the Rodney Miller Series. His violins, violas, and cellos possess a richness and warmth sought out by musicians nationwide. Visit Rodney’s website link below for more information on his recordings and violin making.

Preferred activities and age groups: Performances, hands-on workshops in fiddle techniques, repertoire and/or violin making for all ages. Also works with several New England contra dance callers and can do school dances and concerts.
Fees: Negotiable

111 Brimstone Corner Rd
Antrim, NH 03440
603/588-2655
millerrodneyc@gmail.com
www.rodneymiller.net

Beverly Nemetzbeverly nemetz
Early-American Decorative Painting

Beverly Nemetz specializes in Early American decorative painting, which is sometimes called Tole painting. Tole painting goes back to the 1700s in Europe (England, France, Germany, and Scandanavia) when decorative painting of ceramics and household items like trays, boxes, and furniture became popular. Tole painting is distinguished by single brush strokes, mostly of floral designs. Nemetz learned the tradition from her mother Helen Learned with the help of a Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grant. She preserves her mother’s delicate designs and has developed her own within the tradition. Nemetz is also accomplished in culinary arts and has been giving both private and college level culinary instruction presentations since 1994.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and workshops at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums. Interested in presenting demonstrations for all ages and workshops with adults.
Fees: Negotiable

PO Box 688
Strafford, NH 03884
603/664-2552

Alice Ogdenalice ogden
Brown Ash Baskets

Alice Ogden is a nationally recognized basket maker, specializing in making baskets from locally grown and harvested black ash trees. She uses the traditional methods of pounding and stripping off layers of growth rings from the ash logs, stripping the splints to finer weavers, and carving handles out of white oak logs.
She has been making baskets for over 35 years. She is a juried member of the League of NH Craftsmen and was the maker of the 2013 League of NH Craftsmen annual ornament, making over 4,500 basket ornaments. Alice displayed a Christmas ornament made from split ash on the White House Christmas tree as part of the “year of the American Crafts” in 1995. She has received many awards for her baskets, including an artist fellowship from the New England Foundation for the Arts and was a 2012 Fellow by the NH State Council of the Arts. She was in the Cole/Ware basket exhibit at the Smithsonian and is featured in the Smithsonian book “A Measure of the Earth”. She enjoys sharing her skills with school age children and has many projects that fit into the school curriculum, touching science, math, history and art lessons. She has been teaching through the AIR program since 1992.

Preferred activities and age groups: Lecture-demonstrations; workshops; master classes; residencies for all ages. Grades K-12, colleges, adults, senior citizens; Basket guilds across the country
Fees: School/Community Residencies: $275; contact artist for other fees

35 Flaghole Road
West Franklin, NH 03235
603/934-5012
alice@aliceogden.com
www.aliceogden.com

Diane Louise Pauldiane louise paul
Handcrafted Leatherwork

Diane Louise Paul creates beautiful handcrafted leather items. She began her work in leather making tack for horses and has bridged out to other forms including sleigh bell straps , fire buckets, belts, dog collars, and leashes. She makes each item by hand, cutting, stitching, and finishing the leather with the same tools and techniques used over a hundred years ago. Early American Life magazine named Diane one of the top traditional craftsmen in the country eight years in a row. Diane is also a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. She is one of the craftsmen featured in the 75th Anniversary documentary about the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen, A League of Our Own. Diane has also been featured in WMUR’s New Hampshire Chronicle.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at schools, fairs and festivals, museums and other community locations such as libraries and historical societies for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable

PO Box 1102
North Hampton, NH 03862
603/964-8821
DLPleather@aol.com
www.DianeLouisePaul.com

Helen Pervanashelen pervanas
Greek Cooking

Helen Pervanas preserves the Greek heritage of her family through cooking. If you have always wanted to learn how to make Greek specialty dishes like pita and baklava, she offers workshops on traditional greek cooking. Her demonstrations and workshops provide you with traditional Greek recipes that have been handed down from generation to generation and show you step-by-step how to prepare them. Demonstrations and workshops can be customized for any size group, allowing participants to pick and choose the recipes that will be prepared. Specialty Greek dishes and desserts include: baklava, spanokopita, finikia, pastichio, meatballs, and backed lamb dishes to name a few.
Photo: Helen Pervanas (on right) with her mother Chrysanthe Nagios.

Preferred activities and age groups: Hands-on workshops and presentations for groups of all ages at schools, fairs and festivals, museums, libraries, historical societies and other community locations.
Fees: Fees vary based upon time and /or selected recipes.

17 Birkdale Rd
Bedford, NH 03110
603/472-2249
pervanas@comcast.net

Russell E Poperussell pope
New England Blacksmithing

Perfecting his skill for over 30 years, Russell Pope remains one of a few full-time blacksmiths in the United States. He specializes in decorative functional hand forged ironwork. Russell was raised in North Conway, N.H. and started his shop Elements of Steel in 1975 in Newmarket, N.H.. Russell is an active member and former president of the New England Blacksmiths Guild and a member of the American Blacksmiths Association of North America (ABANA). In 2000, Russell demonstrated traditional blacksmithing for the New Hampshire program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and was commissioned to make an archway gate for the festival site. He demonstrated again at the expanded recreation of the Smithsonian program at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in Hopkinton, N.H.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable

32 North Main St
Newmarket, NH 03857
603/659-2595
www.elementsofsteel.com

Ron Raiselisron raiselis
Cooperage (Wooden Barrel Making)

Ron Raiselis is one of the few active coopers (wooden barrel maker) in the United States. The word “cooper” is most likely derived from the Latin word for vat "cupa." In New England, coopers arrived with the first English settlers in the 1620s and their work was essential to commerce and daily life. Ron’s great Grandfather, Benedict Raiselis, immigrated to the United States from Lithuania and took up the cooper’s trade in Meriden, Connecticut. Benedict made many of his own tools which Ron still occasionally uses today. Ron began started his journey as a cooper at Sturbridge Village in the 1970s and trained with cooper Lenny Julian. Ron has gone on to become a master cooper himself and is an expert at making barrels for dry goods and barrels that can hold liquid, called tight kegs or wet cooperage. Ron has served as the resident cooper at Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, N.H. since 1985, where he maintains a traditional cooperage shop. He demonstrates for school children and other visitors to the museum. He has been demonstrating the trade of cooperage at many living history museums in New Hampshire, Maine, and beyond for over 20 years.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and lectures at schools, fairs, festivals, museums, and other community settings for all ages. Interested in working with school aged children - middle school through high school.
Fees: Negotiable

PO Box 4054
Portsmouth, NH 03802
603/502-6350
rpraiselis@gmail.com

Jon Siegeljon siegel
Traditional Furniture: Wood Turning

Jon Siegel is a wood turner. His fascination with wood began at age 14 when his father bought him a lathe from Sears. Siegel is now accomplished at his craft and makes wood turnings for furniture and architectural applications, original furniture, and enjoys teaching and demonstrating wood turning. He has demonstrated at the World Turning Conference in Wilmington, DE; the American Association of Woodturners National Symposia in Providence, RI and Akron, OH; and five times at the New England Turning Symposia held in New Hampshire. Siegel represented New Hampshire at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and at the Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton. He is a founding member of the Guild of New Hampshire Woodworkers, a group dedicated to woodworking education, and a long time member of the New Hampshire Furniture Masters Association. Machining metal is another of Siegel’s interests. He has a full machine shop next to his wood shop where he restores antique machinery and makes tools for himself and others. In 1995, he and his wife Patrice started Big Tree Tools, Inc., a company dedicated to providing innovative tools and accessories for wood workers and turners. He is also an avid pool player and makes custom pool cues.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at schools, community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable

258 Breezy Hill Rd
Wilmot, NH 03287
603/768-5882
big@proctornet.com
www.bigtreeturnings.com

Bob Taylorbob taylor
Welding & Metal Sculpture

Bob Taylor is a welder of practical things for local businesses during the working day. After hours, he turns his traditional skills to more fanciful efforts and becomes a welder of creatures large and small. He is joined my members of his family and close friends in this work and they have populated much of the township of Alstead with their fanciful creations, which include a giant praying mantis, a moose, a gargoyle, a bear, and an eagle. Bob Taylor was among the crafts people invited to represent New Hampshire’s Yankee ingenuity at the 1999 Smithsonian Folklife Festival and again at the expanded recreation Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and workshops at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable

PO Box 253
Alstead, NH 03602-0253
603/835-2569

Jay Traynerjay trayner
Wooden Boat Building & Restoration

Jay Trayner specializes in restoring wooden boats. He grew up in Connecticut and developed an interest in boats at a young age. He took classes from the noted boat builder John Gardner at Mystic Seaport. After high school, he furthered his boatbuilding education in Eastport, Maine. This led him to a career in boat building with a specialty of preserving wooden boats. He also makes canoe paddles and caned seats for his canoes. A versatile woodworker, Jay does fine interior work including stairs.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages. Workshops for high school students to adults.
Fees: Negotiable

30 West Joppa Rd
Warner, NH 03278
603/491-0033
trainer.jay@gmail.com

Kung-Tai Tsaykung tai tsay
Chinese Knot Tying & Chinese Dance

Kung Tai Tsay is both a talented crafts person and accomplished dancer. In her craft work, she specializes in the intricate art of Chinese knot tying. In Chinese tradition, ornamental knots tied with colorful cordage and tassels often adorn wall plaques, scroll weights, and other items. Kung Tai has been tying ornamental knots for many years and is expert in a variety of styles. Kung Tai has been involved with Chinese dance since the early 1990s when she began to study with Chinese dance masters in the Boston area. In 1999, Kung Tai was invited to represent New Hampshire at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and she also demonstrated at the expanded recreation Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton, N.H. In 2008, she received a Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grant to study classical Chinese dance with master dancer Chu Ling. Kung Tai Tsay is founder of the LeeRen Dance Troupe, a non profit organization dedicated to using dance as a means of communication across different cultures.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations, performances, and workshops at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for all ages.
Fees: Negotiable

11 Shadowbrook Dr
Nashua, NH 03062
603/889-5885
tsay@mac.com

Ann Winterlingann winterling
New England Hooked Rugs

Ann Winterling is a master of traditional rug hooking. She first studied with famed rug hooker Hallie Hall of Contoocook and went on to learn from other specialists including Mary Sheppard Burton and Mary Anne Wise. Ann creates her own designs, many of which are based on her early memories of farm life in New England. She has exhibited her rugs nationally and internationally. She is active in a variety of guilds including The International Guild of Handhooking Rug Makers (TIGHR), The Green Mountain Guild, and the her local chapter of the Association of Traditional Hooking Artists Guild (ATHA), White Mountain Woolen Magic. She is also a juried member of the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen. In 1999, Ann was invited to demonstrate rug hooking for the New Hampshire program at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival and she also demonstrated at the expanded recreation Celebrate New Hampshire festival held in 2000 in Hopkinton, N.H. Ann’s rugs appear in a variety of publications including "Textiles Which Lift the Spirit” and " A Guide to the Creative Life” by Mary Sheppard Burton, books by Jessie Turbane, nationally known conservator and collector of hooked rugs, and in several books by Linda Rae Coughlin. In 2005 and 2006, Ann received two Traditional Arts Apprenticeship grants to pass on the tradition of rug hooking to apprentice Julie Robinson. Ann has been nominated for a national Heritage Fellowship Award from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations at community locations such as libraries, historic societies, fairs, festivals, and museums for adults and children over 10 years.
Fees: Negotiable

149 East Side Dr #124
Concord, NH 03301
603/225-5827
cwinterling@comcast.net

Robert Wyattbob wyatt
Fly Tying

Bob Wyatt has been tying flies since he was 12 years old watching and learning from his Dad who tied Classic Atlantic Salmon flies. He grew up taking family fishing trips to Nova Scotia, and started tying flies professionally at age 40 and is deeply rooted in the fishing tradition. Today in addition to tying flies he leads fishing charters, teaches group workshops in tying, and builds custom rods. He enjoys the intricate handiwork needed to tie fly recipes and had been praised as a patient instructor. He has taught workshops for the NH Fish and Game, NH State Council on the Arts, and Trout Unlimited.

Preferred activities and age groups: Demonstrations and hands-on workshops for Junior High age through adults.
Fees: Fee negotiable depending on length of demonstration, size of workshop, and miles traveled.

82 Fisherville Rd Lot 9
Concord, NH 03303
603/344-8698
wyattsflys@comcast.net
www.wyattsflys.com

 

 

 

 


Last updated: January 6, 2021

 
 
 
 
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