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Definition and Role (MNA)

In 2001, the Administrative Rules were updated and section Nur 800 (formerly Nur 900) was added to reflect a new designation: the Medication Nursing Assistant (MNA). This information is intended to define the roles of the RN, LPN and MNA.

What is a Medication Nursing Assistant (MNA)?

What is the role of the MNA?

What does "stable" mean?

As a MNA, how will I know if the clients to whom I am administering medications are stable?

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What is a Medication Nursing Assistant (MNA)?

A Medication Nursing Assistant (MNA) is a Licensed Nursing Assistant (LNA) who has completed a Board approved medication administration program conducted by a Board approved Registered Nurse. Board approved medication administration programs must offer a minimum of 30 hours of theoretical content and 30 hours of clinical content.

In order to qualify as a student to take a Board approved medication administration program, there are strict criteria. The LNA must have the following qualifications:

  • he/she must hold a valid and unrestricted nursing assistant license,
  • he/she have been employed as a LNA within the past 5 years for an equivalent of 2 years of full time employment, and
  • he/she must possess proficiency in English and basic math.

The prospective MNA student must state their desire to be proficient in the administration of medications and submit two character references from an employer affirming their honesty, integrity, compassion and enthusiasm for nursing-related activities. The prospective student may not have a history of felony conviction and is expected to comply with the application and tuition requirements of the sponsoring institution.

Upon completion of a Board approved medication administration program, the LNA must apply to the Board of Nursing and be issued a "Certificate" to administer medications.

Certification as a MNA allows the LNA to administer medications under the supervision of a RN/LPN to "stable" clients.

What is the role of the MNA?

The MNA is intended to function as a care partner of the RN/LPN in the task of medication of administration to stable clients.

What does "stable" mean?

Stable is defined in Nur 101.19 and "means a client whose health status is under control and raises no expectation that the client's symptoms, vital signs, or reactions to medications will suddenly change."

As a MNA, how will I know if the clients to whom I am administering medications are stable?

As a MNA, it is not your responsibility to determine the stability of the clients to whom you have been assigned to administer medications. This is the responsibility of the supervising RN or LPN. The RN or LPN will determine which clients are stable and, based on the principles of delegation outlined in Nur 404, can be appropriately assigned to the MNA.

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New Hampshire Board of Nursing
121 South Fruit Street   |  Concord, NH 03301
Nursing (603) 271-2323  |  Nursing Assistant (603) 271-6282
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