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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 18, 2013

Shelly Angers, N.H. Department of Cultural Resources
(603) 271-3136
shelly.angers@dcr.nh.gov
Twitter: @NHCulture

New N.H. Historical Highway Marker: Zealand

The N.H. Division of Historical Resources is pleased to announce that a New Hampshire Historical Highway Marker has been installed on Route 302 in Carroll to commemorate the 19th-century logging village of Zealand and its founder, James Everell Henry.

The marker reads:

“Zealand and James Everell Henry

“The village of Zealand grew up in 1875 to serve the logging industry. Henry owned 10,000 acres in the heart of the White Mtns., with a 10-mile railroad to move logs from forest to sawmill. The village had a post office, school, store, housing, and charcoal kilns to eke out every bit of forest value. Depending on the season, the logging business employed 80 – 250 men. By 1885, Henry left the Valley moving on to Lincoln, leaving the area mostly clear cut. From 1886 – 1903, fires destroyed the valley and village.”

Zealand is not the only New Hampshire village to rise and fall with the lumber industry. A number of other small villages across White Mountain region were also abandoned when their timber resources were depleted. Historic highway markers mark the locations of three others, in Bethlehem, Easton and Littleton.

Any municipality, agency, organization or individual wishing to propose a historical highway marker to commemorate significant New Hampshire places, persons or events must submit a petition of support signed by at least 20 New Hampshire citizens. They must also draft the text of the marker and provide footnotes and copies of supporting documentation, as well as a suggested location for marker placement.

New Hampshire’s historical highway markers illustrate the depth and complexity of our history and the people who made it, from the last Revolutionary War soldier to contemporary sports figures to poets and painters who used New Hampshire for inspiration; from 18th-century meeting houses to stone arch bridges to long-lost villages; from factories and cemeteries to sites where international history was made.

An interactive map of all of the state’s historical highway markers is available at the N.H. Division of Historical Resources’ website, www.nh.gov/nhdhr.

The New Hampshire Historical Highway marker program is jointly managed by the N.H. Division of Historical Resources and N.H. Department of Transportation.

New Hampshire's Division of Historical Resources, the “State Historic Preservation Office,” was established in 1974. The historical, archaeological, architectural, engineering and cultural resources of New Hampshire are among the most important environmental assets of the state. Historic preservation promotes the use, understanding and conservation of such resources for the education, inspiration, pleasure and enrichment of New Hampshire’s citizens. For more information, visit us online at www.nh.gov/nhdhr or by calling (603) 271-3483.

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