New Hampshire
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Weather in New Hampshire      Back to Traditions

The weather affects many livelihoods in New Hampshire. Extreme weather, like a big ice storm can wreak havoc on sugar maples or a wet spring can prevent bees from properly pollinating apple trees. A snowless winter can make it difficult for the ski industry.

Luckily for New Hampshire, highly competent meteorologists and climatologists study extreme weather patterns and long-term changes in climate. At the Mount Washington Observatory that sits atop the state's highest mountain (elevation 6,288 feet), the staff records what has been called "the worst weather in the world." They also report on weather phenomena on a daily radio broadcast "Weather from Mt. Washington" and maintain a weather museum.

New Hampshire's varied topography, ranging from sea to mountains, causes extremely changeable weather. The northern part of the state may have -50 degree temperatures in the winter, and seacoast summers can reach 100+ degrees. While they have a keen interest in the weather and its effect on daily activities, New Hampshire natives have also learned to take it in stride. As one guidebook* says, "Weather is weather.... You're just supposed to dress for it."

In New Hampshire the weather is governed by the seasons, the brief abundance of spring and summer gives way to a glorious fall and a long cold winter.

In New Hampshire the weather is governed by the seasons, the brief abundance of spring and summer gives way to a glorious fall and a long cold winter.

*Nancy Elcock and Sally Wilkens, The Insiders Guide to New Hampshire.

Photo credits
All: Photographer - Lynn Martin Graton