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Air Rail Highway Bike/Ped Public Transit
Project Overview
The I-93 Transit Investment Study is a study to identify a long-term vision of transit investments that are needed and feasible to accommodate future travel demand in the I-93 corridor from Boston to Manchester, New Hampshire. These include rail, bus, and ride-sharing alternatives. This study is a first step toward implementation of a range of transit alternatives and will lead to an Environmental Assessment (EA) or Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the preferred alternatives. The study will also determine when and how those investments should be implemented.

I-93The study, which began in August 2006, was completed in December 2008. The study included three phases. Phase 1 included the developing of the Purpose and Need statement, setting goals and objectives, identifying issues, developing and implementing a Public Involvement Plan, collecting and analyzing data, and developing the initial alternatives. Phase 2 included refining alternatives, developing draft recommendations, and developing the travel demand model and alternative analysis. Phase 3 included developing and presenting a strategic plan.

The I-93 Transit Investment Study requires an appropriate balance among three critical elements:

  • a multi-jurisdictional decision-making process;
  • built on sound technical analysis; and
  • informed by an effective public/stakeholder involvement strategy.

Project Scope

The project scope included three phases of work over a 20-month period.  Phase 1 included the developing of the Purpose and Need statement, setting goals and objectives, identifying issues, developing and implementing a Public Involvement Plan, collecting and analyzing data, and developing the initial alternatives.  Phase 2 included refining alternatives, developing draft recommendations, and developing the travel demand model and alternative analysis.  Phase 3 included developing and presenting a strategic plan. 

A general outline of the scope is listed below:

1: Purpose and Need, alternatives development
1.1: Review studies, reports; summary
1.2: Identify, evaluate existing data
1.3: Research legal, institutional, land-use policy dependencies potentially impacting transit implementation
1.4: Develop outreach plan
1.5: Two public meetings
1.6: Meet interested parties; 20 in Phase I
1.7: Purpose and Need statement
1.8: Identify initial alternatives

2: Refinement, screening of alternatives
2.1: Land-use policy report
2.1.1: Baseline report; existing conditions
2.1.2: Transit-supportive policy alternatives
2.1.3: Station-area development potential
2.1.4: Impact of land-use policy scenarios
2.2: Alternatives evaluation criteria
2.3: Define conceptual alternatives (up to eight): HOV, rail, TSM, BRT
2.4: Evaluation
2.5: Present to committees
2.6: Finalize, alternatives
2.7: Benefits, impacts: economic, environmental, cultural, secondary growth
2.8: Two informational meetings
2.9: Develop TDF model – based on Nashua model
2.10: Alternative forecasts
2.11: TDF report
2.12: Define Tier 2 alternatives (up to four)
2.13: Evaluate alternatives
2.14: Three conceptual station design approaches
2.15: Define, illustrate TOD opportunities
2.16: Benefits, impacts
2.17: “Regulatory framework report”

3: Strategic implementation plan
3.1: Committee discussion
3.2: Draft plan, including financial plan
3.3: Public information meetings
3.4: Advisory committee approval
3.5: Finalize plan, including study deliverables

 





New Hampshire Department of Transportation
PO Box 483 | 7 Hazen Drive | Concord, NH | 03302-0483
Tel: 603.271-3734 | Fax: 603.271.3914

copyright 2009. State of New Hampshire